Jazz up your Product Photos for the Festive Season!

Christmas is here! And by "here" I mean it's October and the shops are starting to surreptitiously put tinsel on the sides of aisle and sneaking "Jingle Bells" into their playlists. Snowmen are also starting to appear everywhere despite there being no snow.

This is done for a really good reason - to get people into the festive mood for a longer time so that they will buy more! You can do the same in your product photos - add a little bit of holly and some holiday themed keywords (And tinsel - there's always tinsel!) and your store will be looking perfect for those organised shoppers that arrive in early November. And then the idiots that don't do anything until Christmas Eve. (Can you tell which one I am?!)

Background

Although your product is the main focus of your photo, there's nothing wrong with having a blurry Christmas tree in the background, or some pretty twinkling lights along the top. Take a look at the difference here:

Photo by Rachel Evans

Accessories

Selling a teddy bear? Pop a festive scarf on him! Or add a little Christmas hat. So long as an accessory doesn't distract from the product and you mention if it's included or not, there's nothing wrong with dressing up an item for Christmas.

Photo by Rachel Evans

Lighting

If there's ever a time to make the lights twinkly, and to invoke low lighting and cosy fireplace shots, it's at Christmas - So long as the lighting doesn't change the look of the product completely, you can make it look as cosy as you want - if you can add the smell of chestnuts roasting on an open fire, that would be pretty cool too.
Photo by Rachel Evans

Setting

Putting your product in a perfect setting can make a customer see it in their own homes - ensure that it's not the only photo and that there are plenty of shots of the item as well, so that they don't get sold something misleading, but by all means put a toy penguin in front of an igloo, or some oven-gloves on a person's hands as they get something out of the oven. When a customer sees something being used, they can envision using it easier.
Photo by Rachel Evans